Laine issue 4: Linna

Laine Issue 4
Twig & Horn Packages
Laine Issue 4 Linna
Laine Issue 4 Linna

I believe good branding is such a gift--I'm a sucker for good design, lovely packaging, and thoughtful brand touches. It's hard to believe that I just recently bought my first ever copy of Laine Magazine. I'd been following Laine religiously on Instagram, but for some inexplicable reason, had yet to order the publication. Once I saw the teasers for the  Magnolia, Eri, and Morginn sweaters, the Linna issue quickly made its way into my Twig & Horn shopping cart! When the package arrived in the mail on Saturday, I purposely left it sealed so that I could savor my first viewing. 

On Sunday morning, after brewing my morning coffee, I lit the mahogany-scented candle on the dining room table (which was also covered in wool, of course), and released the magazine from its brown paper wrapper. Then, page by page, I slowly worked my way through the Winter/Spring 2018 issue of this gorgeous Nordic knitting pub. 

Knitters--it was an inspiring experience. The weight and color of the paper stock, the photography, the typeface, the layout, the articles and interviews--even the advertisements--were a treat for the eyes. I vow to own every Laine magazine from this point forward.


Also in that package was Twig & Horn's K2TOG Club Enamel Wool Pin. It makes the perfect addition to my work-bag flair, doesn't it? 

What about you, friends? Which knitting publications and products are you loving these days?

weekend prep.

Quince & Co. Lark Yarn
Library
Log Cabin Socks

This week, I spent a little time prepping for my weekend knitting projects:

First, I finally learned how to hand-wind a center-pull ball of yarn, which will be used on my secret WIP. I actually used my Beauty Blender container to start the ball, after seeing someone on Instagram use an old film canister. Sometimes the strand catches and needs a little extra tug to release, but overall, it works! I think I just wound those first few rounds a little too tightly, so next time, I'll try relaxing my tension. This is the first new skill I've added to my repertoire this year!

On Wednesday, I stopped into my local library to photocopy the Log Cabin Socks pattern out of the book, Handknit Holidays. (Question: does anyone else visit the library for knitting patterns?) Inspired by Jared's gorgeous version, these cozy slipper socks will be a (very late) Christmas knit for my very patient niece. Since the pattern calls for bulky weight yarn, I'm hoping these are a quick, satisfying knit.

What about you? What are you working on this weekend? 

yarn love | my very first knits

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My love of fiber and all things woolen runs deep--and grows deeper each day. Today, I couldn't imagine a day without knitting, but when I think about how it all started, I marvel at the small chain of events that had to occur in order to bring knitting into my life. 

My first cast on occurred in a hospital waiting room over nine years ago. You see, my mother has battled severe health issues over the past decade, and when her illness was first discovered, my younger sister and I spent hours and hours, days upon days, sitting in drab-beige hospital waiting rooms bored out of our minds. One day, my sister casually turned to me and said: "You know, while I was out in Oregon visiting Mom Jodie (her mother-in-law), she taught me how to knit. How about I bring in some yarn and needles tomorrow and I'll show you? It'll at least give us something to do while we sit here." I said yes, and so she did. 

The next day, she arrived at the hospital with two, long bamboo knitting needles and a skein of Red Heart Super Saver acrylic yarn in the brightest shade of turquoise I'd ever seen. Sitting in the peach, pleather-covered chairs, she patiently showed me the long tail cast on, then, slowly demonstrated the four movements that would forever impact my life.

Tip the wooden needle into the tiny loop of fiber, wrap the yarn around the working needle, tuck the tip back through the loop, then slip off the completed stitch!

I was mesmerized. My stitches were tight at first, but slowly, as I became more confident in the movements, they began to relax and even out. Row after row, a soft fabric began to form, and at that moment, I knew I was a lifelong knitter. The funny part of this story is that my sister never took to knitting; she only knew the one stitch. She couldn't teach me how to purl or bind off, so from that day forward, I became a YouTube-watching knitting junkie--devouring videos about stockinette, tension, and weaving in ends. 

The very next week, I went to my local yarn store and picked out two skeins of Brown Sheep's Lanaloft Aran wool in a beautiful red and pink ombre, and cast on my first scarf--bravely--without a pattern. It was my first time knitting with wool, and I fell in love with the sheepy characteristics of the fiber. How it felt in my hands, so warm and responsive. I was proud of myself for 'conceptualizing' a scarf with garter edges and smooth, center stockinette panel. I took my time with the scarf, counting my stitches after each row, checking to make sure the loops were perfect before moving onto the next. I didn't know it at the time, but I was learning to read my knitting--a skill that's come in handy as my projects have grown in complexity. Despite its curling edges, I felt an immeasurable sense of pride when the scissors cut the working yarn from the finished object.

With my hands, two sticks, and some wool, I had made an article of clothing. Knitting felt like a gift, and I never looked back. 

So today, on this St. Valentine's Day, I celebrate my love for this craft. Sometimes I wonder if my sister didn't take that trip to Oregon, and didn't have a knitting mother-in-law, and and if my mother hadn't come down with an incurable, lifelong illness, would I be a knitter today? It's possible. However, when I think about how much joy, happiness, and connection that knitting has brought to my life, it's unimaginable what life would be like without it.